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Thursday, April 26, 2007

Making Disciples - A Homeschool Mom's Great Commission

Like many of you, I spent years in women's Bible studies, growing in my knowledge and understanding of the Lord and His Word. I'm so thankful for that time of spiritual growth, and was loath to give it up for the homeschooling years.

One day, during my quiet time, God impressed a profound truth upon my heart. The Lord had grown me during that season of intense Bible study, not just for my own personal development, but to pass on these truths to my disciples. And disciples are what God has given me in my children and through homeschooling! What a responsibility! Sounds just like the Great Commission. Wow. Is that what homeschooling is really all about? Making disciples? As I became aware of this incredible responsibility, I was instantly awakened to how I had failed. I had spent most of my disciple training time teaching direct objects, how to spell "their, they're, and there," and how to carry and borrow. All important things, of course. But not nearly as important as nourishing my children’s souls with spiritual truths and conveying to them the teaching that was passed on to me.

But could a six year old really grasp the profound implications of our covenant relationship with Jesus? Yes, I soon learned. My six year old had accepted Christ, had the Spirit of the Living God within, and had the ability to discern Spiritual truths. True, he could only respond to the light which he had been given, and only on the level with which his personality and maturity allowed; but isn't that true of all of us?

Worship time with my children became the highlight of each morning. Rather soon after breakfast and chores, we gathered on the couch for a wonderful time of fellowship, prayer, and learning. As with all the things we did consistently, our morning worship was not a big complicated affair. It was easy for me, and thus always got done. We read, talked, shared our thoughts, and prayed.

I utilized devotions from trusted Bible teachers to fuel our discussions. If you’ve already read Leading Little Ones to God, or if most of your students are middle schoolers, choose an adult devotional. Sadly, devotion books for kids are often too elementary or concern issues found in public schools—such as popular kids and bullies. Most homeschooled kids are capable of understanding the deep spiritual truths found in adult level devotionals. I recommend looking for something from someone you trust. When you run across concepts and vocabulary that are too difficult for your children to grasp, stop and explain them in words they can understand. This will foster spiritual closeness and will make the Word of God come alive in your family’s days. In addition, it will bless you as you remember and discuss the glorious nature of God, our relationship to Him, and the many wonderful truths you have learned throughout your walk with Him.

Yes, moms, our time of being taught has come to a temporary closure, and now we have the privilege of training our disciples and living out the Great Commission in our homes, remembering the words of Paul, "Therefore be careful how you walk, not as the unwise but as wise, making the most of your time, because the days are evil."


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